Balancing ‘Expert’ opinion

It is known, the sun’s rays can be harmful. Scientific studies, the world over, have proven this beyond doubt. Scientists involved in the research of skin cancers and the medical profession dealing with skin cancer patients, will have a strong bias in their opinions against sun exposure. This is perhaps more clearly defined as 90% of all skin cancers are sun related and are, in the main, preventable.

Here’s one statistic you may consider: There are about 68,000 cases of skin cancer reported in the UK per annum

It is also known, the sun’s rays can be beneficial. Equally, scientific studies, the world over, have proven this beyond doubt. Scientists involved in the research of internal cancers, depression and Vitamin D deficiencies and the medical profession dealing with patients from a number of these illnesses, will have a bias in their opinions for some sun exposure.

Here’s another statistic you may consider: During summer, roughly about 10 minutes of sun exposure per day, will produce in the body sufficient intake of Vitamin D

Modern medical research is a complicated process. One stream or another will tend to specialise in their own field. Where there is a benefit for one group, there is a disadvantage for another, this is why there are medical differences of opinion and why it is not easy, to clearly identify, exactly what to do for the best.

There are, however, two distinct points all the ‘experts’ do agree on:-

i) Never sunburn
ii) Avoid the sun between the hours of 11am and 3pm, wherever possible.

The key to making the most of the sun, is to find the right balance, exposure but not overexposure. Maximise the benefit, minimise the risk.

Moderation holds the key

 
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